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Format: 2015-03-06
Format: 2015-03-06
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    15 March 2015 - 3:30pm
    Ivy House Music and Dance | Cristina Ortiz (piano)
    Cristina Ortiz
    Ivy House, London Jewish Cultural Centre London NW11 7SX
    United Kingdom

    Brazilian born Cristina Ortiz has appeared with the world’s greatest orchestras including the Berlin Philharmonic, Vienna Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony, Royal Concertgebouw and the Philharmonia with conductors Vladimir Ashkenazy, Neeme Jarvi and Mariss Jansons. The sensuous beauty and technical refinement of her playing is reflected in this inspirational choice of major works by Frederic Chopin.

    Photo: Sussie Ahlburg

    Dates for your diary:

    - Claire Martin and Joe Stilgoe - Jazz at Ivy House
    Thursday 19 March 2015, 8pm

    - Exclusive tour of The Royal Opera House
    Tuesday 24 March 2015, 2:30pm

    Fantasie in F minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Sonata for Piano No 2 in B flat minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Barcarolle in F sharp
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Sonata for Piano No 3 in B minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
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    11 March 2015 - 7:30pm
    Chester Music Society celebrity concert | Amy Green (saxophone)
    Amy Green, Christine Zerafa
    St Mary's Centre Chester CH1 2DW
    United Kingdom

    Amy graduated from the Royal College of Music in 2012 with first class honours and continued her studies there for a Master of Performance, graduating in July 2014 and winning the Edward and Helen Hague Senior Woodwind Prize. She studied for a term at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique et de Danse de Paris on an Erasmus exchange. Amy has performed at venues including the Royal Albert Hall, Cadogan Hall, Royal Festival Hall, the V&A museum and the National Gallery. She performed in the 2012 BBC Proms with the London Sinfonietta.

    Maltese pianist Christine Zerafa has appeared in various concert series and festivals, including the Malta Arts Festival and the Embassy Series in Washington D.C, and has been recipient of various awards including the RNCM Clifton Helliwell Memorial Prize and the RAM Scott Huxley Accompaniment Prize. She is currently reading for a Masters degree in piano accompaniment at the Royal Academy of Music.. Her studies have been kindly supported by the Janatha Stubbs Foundation, the Silverstone Bursary, the Malta Arts Fund and the Royal Academy of Music.

    Aria
    Eugene Bozza (1905-1991)
    Pièce en forme de habanera
    Maurice Ravel (1875-1937)
    Divertissement for saxophone and piano
    Pierre-Max Dubois (1930-1995)
    Concerto for oboe and strings in D minor
    Alessandro Benedetto (1684-1750)
    Sonata for saxophone and piano
    Fernande Decruck (1896-1954)
    Caprice en forme de valse
    Paul Bonneau (1918-1995)
    Le Carnaval de Venise
    Jules Demersseman (1833-1866)
    Prélude No 12, Minstrels from 12 Préludes, Book 1
    Claude Debussy (1862-1918)
    Prélude No 2, Voiles from 12 Préludes, Book 1
    Claude Debussy (1862-1918)
    Pan from 6 Metamorphoses after Ovid, for oboe
    Benjamin Britten (1913-1976)
    Rhapsodie for alto saxophone and orchestra
    Claude Debussy (1862-1918)
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    12 March 2015 - 7:45pm
    Sacconi String Quartet
    Benjamin Hancox, Cara Berridge, Hannah Dawson, Robin Ashwell, Sacconi String Quartet
    St Gregory's Centre, Canterbury Christ Church University Canterbury CT1 1NX
    United Kingdom

    The Sacconi Quartet is recognised for its unanimous and compelling ensemble, performing with style and commitment and consistently communicating with a fresh and imaginative approach. Formed in 2001, its four founder members continue to demonstrate a shared passion for string quartet repertoire, infectiously reaching out to audiences with their energy and enthusiasm. Over the past decade they have enjoyed a highly successful international career, performing regularly throughout Europe, at London’s major venues, in recordings and on radio broadcasts. The Sacconi Quartet is Quartet in Association at the Royal College of Music and Quartet in Residence at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre.

    Quartet Out of Time
    Jonathan Dove (1959-)
    String Quartet No 16 in E flat
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Quintet for Clarinet and Strings in B minor
    Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
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    12 March 2015 - 7:45pm
    Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra
    Antoine Tamestit, Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, Nicholas McGegan, Veronika Eberle
    The Anvil Basingstoke RG21 7QR
    United Kingdom

    Brahms made his own orchestrations of some of the enchanting waltzes he had previously written for voices and piano. They show the composer at his most relaxed and good humoured. Even by Mozart’s standards, his Sinfonia concertante revels in a wealth of melody and invention. It may be that he was displaying his musical skill in the hope of a court position, and the piece is a model of contrast and balance. Beethoven’s symphony was first performed at a mammoth concert in 1813 which was one of his greatest public successes. Its joyous energy and rhythmic impetus have made it among the most popular of all his symphonies.

    Liebeslieder Waltzes
    Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
    Sinfonia Concertante for Violin, Viola and Orchestra in E flat
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Symphony No 7 in A
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
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    14 March 2015 - 7:30pm
    London Handel Players
    The London Handel Players
    Vinehall School Theatre Robertsbridge TN32 5JL
    United Kingdom

    For over ten years, since making their debut at Handel’s parish church, St. George’s Hanover Square, as part of the London Handel Festival 2000, the London Handel Playershave thrilled audiences across the world with their performances and recordings. They perform regularly at the Wigmore Hall and appear at many of the leading festivals in the UK, Europe and North America, collaborating with singers such as Emma Kirkby, James Bowman and Daniel Taylor. The members of the group pursue busy solo and directing careers, work with many of the major early-instrument ensembles in the UK and abroad and are professors at the conservatoires in London. They bring together a wealth of recording experience and their four recent recordings, of Handel’s Op.2 and Op.5 trio sonatas, his complete violin sonatas and one entitled “Handel at Home”, all for Somm, have been highly acclaimed. A further CD, of the complete Sonatas Opus 1 by Francesco Geminiani was released in December 2012.

    “As performances, these want for nothing in terms of technical brilliance and musical integrity, and the recorded balance is singularly satisfying.” International Record Review (Marc Rochester), April 2013

    Concerts have recently included appearances at the Swansea, Newbury, Tilford, Spitalfields and Gregynog Festivals, Birmingham and Brighton Early Music Festivals, for Music at Oxford and in Warwick, at the Palau de la Musica, Barcelona and at the Music and Beyond Festival in Ottawa as well as the Internationale Händel-Festspiele Göttingen. They made their US debut in January 2012, with concerts in Los Angeles and the Frick Collection, New York and they returned to Canada last October. In 2011 the London Handel Players were joined by Scottish fiddler Alasdair Fraser for a late-night concert at the Wigmore Hall and they performed with him again for Spitalfields Music and in Aberdeen in December 2012.

    Plans include a further appearance at the Wigmore Hall as part of the 2014 London Handel Festival and a return visit to the Internationale Händel-Festspiele Göttingen.

    "I find all the performances well-nigh perfect...the music is absolutely gorgeous" Piers Burton-Page, International Record Review (Handel Trio Sonatas Op.5)
    “equally delectable results...” Piers Burton-Page, International Record Review, May 2009 (Handel Trio Sonatas Op.2)

    “This extremely attractive release is sure to find a wide audience; it’s as much fun as it is beautiful.” Robert Levett, International Record Review (“Handel at Home”)

    “Their consummate musicianship is consistently delightful” David Vickers, Gramophone Magazine (“Handel at Home”)

    “These are fine performances from players who really know their ground." Lindsay Kemp, Gramophone, July 09 (Handel Trio Sonatas Op.2)

    "Piers Burton-Page welcomed the London Handel Players’ Somm account of Handel’s Op.5 as “well-nigh perfect” (September 2005), a view from which I would not dissent regarding the current issue...these three outstandingly gifted players are at the peak of their collective form..." Julian Haylock, International Record Review, March 08 (Handel Violin Sonatas)

    Concerto for Flute, Violin and Strings in E minor
    Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
    Organ Concerto No 13 in F, 'The Cuckoo and the Nightingale'
    George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)
    Concerto for Violin and Strings in A
    Jean-Marie Leclair (1697-1764)
    Concerto for flautino (descant recorder). strings and basso continuo in C
    Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741)
    Brandenburg Concerto No 5 in D
    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
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    13 March 2015 - 5:45pm
    A Weekend of Mozart- Concert 1: Daniel Tong (piano) and Alasdair Beatson (piano)
    Alasdair Beatson, Daniel Tong
    The Castle Hotel Taunton TA1 1NF
    United Kingdom

    ‘The miracle that God let be born in Salzburg’, to quote Mozart’s father, is today enshrined as the most popular of all classical composers: the most played, the most mythologised, the most commercially exploited. His genius is rightly hailed as universal, protean. Yet even in an age when Mozart has never had it so good, there are masterpieces that seldom appear on concert programmes.

    This weekend-long celebration of Mozart’s chamber music and song (of which this is concert 1 of 4) seeks to counter this, balancing the familiar – the two piano quartets, and the tragic A minor Sonata – with comparative rarities like the E flat String Trio, K.563, whose profundity belies its billing as a ‘Divertimento’. Mary Bevan’s programme of Mozart’s songs may surprise those who think that German Lieder began with Schubert – to contrast with this, she also performs a number of opera arias. And if you are unfamiliar with Mozart’s music for piano duet – still among his best-kept secrets – Daniel Tong’s and Alasdair Beatson’s performances of two magnificent 4-hand works could well come as a revelation.

    Pianist Daniel Tong’s musical life is spent performing as a soloist and chamber musician, directing two chamber music festivals (including his own, in the Wye Valley) and occasionally writing. He has appeared at many of the foremost British venues, and at Aldeburgh, Cheltenham and Edinburgh festivals to name but a few, and is frequently heard on BBC radio.

    Alasdair Beatson is a highly regarded chamber and orchestral pianist. In July 2014 he gave his sixth Wigmore Hall recital and other upcoming engagements include performances with Pieter Wispelwey, Adrian Brendel and Pekka Kuusisto. He has appeared at Aldeburgh, Bath Mozartfest, Delft and Oxford Chamber Music festivals amongst others and has a regular association with the Scottish Ensemble.

    The concept and programme for this weekend is devised by Richard Wigmore – lecturer, writer on music, and broadcaster – who will also give illuminating pre-concert talks. He writes for BBC Music Magazine, The Telegraph and Gramophone.

    Sonata for Piano No 8 in A minor
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Sonata for piano 4-hands in F
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Fantasia in F minor
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
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    14 March 2015 - 10:30am
    A Weekend of Mozart - Concert 2: The London Bridge Ensemble
    Daniel Tong, Kate Gould, London Bridge Ensemble, Michael Gurevich, Tamsin Waley-Cohen
    The Castle Hotel Taunton TA1 1NF
    United Kingdom

    ‘The miracle that God let be born in Salzburg’, to quote Mozart’s father, is today enshrined as the most popular of all classical composers: the most played, the most mythologised, the most commercially exploited. His genius is rightly hailed as universal, protean. Yet even in an age when Mozart has never had it so good, there are masterpieces that seldom appear on concert programmes.

    This weekend-long celebration of Mozart’s chamber music and song (of which this is concert 2 of 4) seeks to counter this, balancing the familiar – the two piano quartets, and the tragic A minor Sonata – with comparative rarities like the E flat String Trio, K.563, whose profundity belies its billing as a ‘Divertimento’. Mary Bevan’s programme of Mozart’s songs may surprise those who think that German Lieder began with Schubert – to contrast with this, she also performs a number of opera arias. And if you are unfamiliar with Mozart’s music for piano duet – still among his best-kept secrets – Daniel Tong’s and Alasdair Beatson’s performances of two magnificent 4-hand works could well come as a revelation.

    Tamsin Waley-Cohen, Kate Gould, and Daniel Tong form The London Bridge Ensemble, one of the UK’s most exciting and brilliant chamber groups. They have performed at major concert venues throughout the UK and recorded to critical acclaim. They are regularly joined by additional string players to perform larger works – for this weekend, Michael Gurevich joins them as guest viola.

    The concept and programme for this weekend is devised by Richard Wigmore – lecturer, writer on music, and broadcaster – who will also give illuminating pre-concert talks. He writes for BBC Music Magazine, The Telegraph and Gramophone.

    Duo for Violin and Viola in B flat
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Sonata for Violin and Piano No 21 in E minor
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Quartet for Piano and Strings No 2 in E flat
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
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    14 March 2015 - 5:45pm
    A Weekend of Mozart - Concert 3: The London Bridge Ensemble
    Daniel Tong, Kate Gould, London Bridge Ensemble, Michael Gurevich, Tamsin Waley-Cohen
    The Castle Hotel Taunton TA1 1NF
    United Kingdom

    ‘The miracle that God let be born in Salzburg’, to quote Mozart’s father, is today enshrined as the most popular of all classical composers: the most played, the most mythologised, the most commercially exploited. His genius is rightly hailed as universal, protean. Yet even in an age when Mozart has never had it so good, there are masterpieces that seldom appear on concert programmes.

    This weekend-long celebration of Mozart’s chamber music and song (of which this is concert 3 of 4) seeks to counter this, balancing the familiar – the two piano quartets, and the tragic A minor Sonata – with comparative rarities like the E flat String Trio, K.563, whose profundity belies its billing as a ‘Divertimento’. Mary Bevan’s programme of Mozart’s songs may surprise those who think that German Lieder began with Schubert – to contrast with this, she also performs a number of opera arias. And if you are unfamiliar with Mozart’s music for piano duet – still among his best-kept secrets – Daniel Tong’s and Alasdair Beatson’s performances of two magnificent 4-hand works could well come as a revelation.

    Tamsin Waley-Cohen, Kate Gould, and Daniel Tong form The London Bridge Ensemble, one of the UK’s most exciting and brilliant chamber groups. They have performed at major concert venues throughout the UK and recorded to critical acclaim. They are regularly joined by additional string players to perform larger works – for this weekend, Michael Gurevich joins them as guest viola.

    The concept and programme for this weekend is devised by Richard Wigmore – lecturer, writer on music, and broadcaster – who will also give illuminating pre-concert talks. He writes for BBC Music Magazine, The Telegraph and Gramophone.

    Quartet for Piano and Strings in G minor
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Divertimento for String Trio in E flat
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
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    15 March 2015 - 10:30am
    A Weekend of Mozart - Concert 4: Mary Bevan (soprano) and Daniel Tong (piano)
    Daniel Tong, Mary Bevan
    The Castle Hotel Taunton TA1 1NF
    United Kingdom

    ‘The miracle that God let be born in Salzburg’, to quote Mozart’s father, is today enshrined as the most popular of all classical composers: the most played, the most mythologised, the most commercially exploited. His genius is rightly hailed as universal, protean. Yet even in an age when Mozart has never had it so good, there are masterpieces that seldom appear on concert programmes.

    This weekend-long celebration of Mozart’s chamber music and song (of which this is concert 4 of 4) seeks to counter this, balancing the familiar – the two piano quartets, and the tragic A minor Sonata – with comparative rarities like the E flat String Trio, K.563, whose profundity belies its billing as a ‘Divertimento’. Mary Bevan’s programme of Mozart’s songs may surprise those who think that German Lieder began with Schubert – to contrast with this, she also performs a number of opera arias. And if you are unfamiliar with Mozart’s music for piano duet – still among his best-kept secrets – Daniel Tong’s and Alasdair Beatson’s performances of two magnificent 4-hand works could well come as a revelation.

    Pianist Daniel Tong’s musical life is spent performing as a soloist and chamber musician, directing two chamber music festivals (including his own, in the Wye Valley) and occasionally writing. He has appeared at many of the foremost British venues, and at Aldeburgh, Cheltenham and Edinburgh festivals to name but a few, and is frequently heard on BBC radio.

    Soprano Mary Bevan trained at the Royal Academy of Music, where she won the prestigious Richard Lewis award. She recently made her Royal Opera House début as Barbarina in Le Nozze di Figaro, and is currently a Harewood Artist at English National Opera. Also a dedicated recitalist, Mary has appeared at the Oxford Lieder Festival and at Wigmore Hall.

    The concept and programme for this weekend is devised by Richard Wigmore – lecturer, writer on music, and broadcaster – who will also give illuminating pre-concert talks. He writes for BBC Music Magazine, The Telegraph and Gramophone.

    Abendempfindung
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Das Veilchen
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Als Luise die Briefe
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Der Zauberer
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    An Chloe
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Das Lied der Trennung (arr. Cox)
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Sehnsucht nach dem Frühling
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Oiseaux, si tous les ans
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Dans un bois solitaire
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Vedrai, carino, from 'Don Giovanni'
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    In uomini, in soldati from Così fan tutte
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Allelujah from Exsultate, jubilate
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Deh vieni, non tardar from Le Nozze di Figaro, 'The Marriage of Figaro'
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
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    10 March 2015 - 7:30pm
    Mendelssohn: Elijah | London Concert Choir and Canticum
    Canticum, Erica Eloff, Jeanette Ager, London Concert Choir, Mark Forkgen, Nicholas Hurndall Smith, Southbank Sinfonia, Toby Stafford-Allen
    Barbican Hall London EC2Y 8DS
    United Kingdom

    Mendelssohn’s great biblical oratorio about the prophet Elijah has remained a choral favourite ever since its premiere at the Birmingham Festival in 1846. The composer was determined that the drama of the story should be of central importance. And dramatic it certainly is: a curse bringing the scourge of drought; then despair, wickedness, cruelty, relief, tenderness and mercy all play their part. The turmoil is finally resolved in an impassioned chorus of praise and thanksgiving to the ‘Lord, our Creator’.

    Elijah
    Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)
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