What's On

Your essential guide to all the best concerts taking place in the UK and Ireland. Click here to find out how to submit an event.
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Format: 2020-01-27
Format: 2020-01-27
  • 28 January 2020 - 6:30pm
    The Royal Guitar | Toby Carr (baroque guitar)
    Toby Carr
    Handel House London W1K 4HB
    United Kingdom

    Toby Carr (baroque guitar) presents a programme of music by Francesco Corbetta, an Italian guitar virtuoso, who travelled all around Europe, including England with Charles II when the monarchy was reinstated.

    Prelude from Suite in G minor, from La La guitarre royalle, for guitar
    Francesco Corbetta (c1615-1681)
    Prelude from Suite in D major, from La guitarre royalle, for guitar
    Francesco Corbetta (c1615-1681)
    Prelude from Suite in E minor, from Varii scherzi di sonate, for guitar
    Francesco Corbetta (c1615-1681)
    Prelude for guitar
    Francesco Corbetta (c1615-1681)
    Caprice du chaconne, for guitar
    Francesco Corbetta (c1615-1681)
    Gavotte aimée du Duc de Monmouth, arranged for guitar
    Francesco Corbetta (c1615-1681)
  • 6 February 2020 - 1:00pm
    Handel’s Heroines | Anna Cavaliero (soprano) and William Cole (harpsichord)
    Anna Cavaliero, William Cole
    Handel House London W1K 4HB
    United Kingdom

    Anna Cavaliero (soprano) explores the strength and richness of Handel’s great female characters, alongside works by his female contemporaries.

    La Lucrezia
    George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)
    L'Eraclito amoroso, 'Udite amanti'
    Barbara Strozzi (1619-?1664)
    Piangerò, la sorte mia from Giulio Cesare
    George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)
    Semele from Cantates françoises
    Elizabeth-Claude Jacquet de la Guerre (1666/67-1729)
    With darkness, deep as is my woe from Theodora
    George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)
    L'amore ed it Destin from Partenope
    George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)
  • 29 January 2020 - 7:30pm
    Endellion String Quartet
    Andrew Watkinson, David Waterman, Endellion String Quartet, Garfield Jackson, Ralph de Souza
    West Road Concert Hall Cambridge CB3 9DP
    United Kingdom

    ‘To experience all of Beethoven’s sixteen quartets — collectively, surely, one of the peaks of human endeavour — is to take a wonderful opportunity both to enter into each of these extraordinarily individual universes, and also to hear them in the context of one another. This enables us to appreciate the family resemblances between them, which make them all unmistakably ‘Beethoven’ — reflecting his profound humanity, integrity, moral seriousness, humour, light-heartedness, love, forcefulness, energy and self-belief. It also highlights the myriad differences of character, mood, style and sound-world which make one marvel at the sheer range, fertility and freshness of Beethoven’s imagination.

    In arranging the programmes, the Quartet’s aim is to give each concert as much variety and balance as possible by choosing pieces of contrasting character, and from different periods.

    The six Op 18 quartets are extraordinary masterpieces and not just preludes to what was to follow. Writing them between the ages of 28 and 30, Beethoven had studied and absorbed the language and style of the great quartets of Haydn and Mozart, but the Op.18s are saturated with Beethoven’s own personality. At this time he was working and performing with colossal energy, was constantly in and out of love, and already sure of his own powers and their true value.

    The ‘Razumovsky’ quartets and Opp 74 and 95, written between the ages of 35 and 40 broke boundaries in scale and profundity, and in their demands on players and listeners alike. Opp 74 and 95 grope towards yet further innovations. In this period, Beethoven was struggling to come to terms with his growing deafness and the social isolation it was imposing on this wonderfully warm and gregarious man. His cry of pain in the ‘Heiligenstadt’ testament is heart-rending; yet no note of self-pity enters his music.

    Beethoven confided his most intimate thoughts to his ‘late’ quartets, written between the ages of 52 and 57 (the age at which he died). His imaginative powers — free of all conventions, practical restraints and compromises — seemed to deepen as his circumstances deteriorated. Ill health, loneliness, financial worries, the increasing rarity of performances of his works especially in a Vienna besotted with Rossini, the attempted suicide of his beloved nephew and ward, Karl — all these were the background to these late works of genius which so baffled Beethoven’s contemporaries, and about which he calmly explained they ‘were written for a later age.’

    ‘There’s always a feeling when listening to the Endellion Quartet that you’re listening to the Urtext method of quartet playing. Maybe 35 years of playing together has brought a uniformity of thought and instinct to them as a group that allows them to play as a single entity’ — Gramophone Magazine

    ‘The Endellion is a quartet of the first rank: precision, clarity of articulation, and beauty of sound characterize both the individual playing and the stimulating interplay of the four team-mates.’ — La Presse, Montreal

    ‘ … The Endellion’s warm sound and impeccable style … they function as an indivisible expressive unit, playing with that innate understanding of each other that only comes from a long experience of making music together … superb … real eloquence and passion … outstandingly done’ — Guardian

    'The Endellion is arguably the finest quartet in Britain, playing with poise, true intonation, excellent balance and a beautiful tone’ — New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians

    String Quartet No 6 in B flat
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
    String Quartet No 16 in F
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
    String Quartet No 10 in E flat, 'Harp'
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • 30 January 2020 - 1:00pm
    All Roads lead to London | Abel Balazs (violin)
    Abel Balazs, Aidan Phillips, Martyna Jankowska
    Handel House London W1K 4HB
    United Kingdom

    Abel Balazs (violin) plays the music of Italian violinists, contemporary to Handel, who found success in London. Several of these musicians even worked alongside Handel such as Castrucci, Carbonelli and Geminiani.

    Sonata in G major
    George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)
    Sonata for violin and continuo No 8 in D minro
    Francesco Geminiani (1687-1762)
    Sonata No 6 in A major, for violin and continuo
    Pietro Castrucci (1679-1752)
    Sonata da camera No 1 in D major. for violin and continuo
    Giovanni Stefano Carbonelli (c1699-1773)
  • 4 February 2020 - 6:30pm
    An Italian in London | Simone Pirri (violin)
    Petra Hajduchova, Simone Pirri, Thomas Chigioni
    Handel House London W1K 4HB
    United Kingdom

    Simone Pirri, a young Italian violinist in London himself, explores the impact of his baroque predecessors, who made London their home and subsequently influenced the style of instrumental music in England from the late 17th to mid 18th century.

    Diverse bizzarrie sopra la vecchia sarabanda o pur ciaccona
    Nicola Matteis (d?1707)
    Movimento incognito from Ayres for Violin, Book 2
    Nicola Matteis (d?1707)
    Air 'The country lass'
    Francesco Geminiani (1687-1762)
    Air 'Auld Bob Morrice'
    Francesco Geminiani (1687-1762)
    Air 'Sleepy Body'
    Francesco Geminiani (1687-1762)
    Violin Sonata No 5 in G minor from 12 Sonate accademiche
    Francesco Maria Veracini (1690–1768)
  • 3 February 2020 - 7:00pm
    Chopin and Champagne by candlelight: Sonata No 2
    Warren Mailley-Smith
    St Luke’s Church Brighton BN2 9ZB
    United Kingdom

    Warren Mailley-Smith recently became the first British pianist to perform Chopin’s complete works for solo piano from memory in a series of 11 recitals at St John’s Smith Square. Hailed by the critics as an “epic achievement”, Mailley-Smith will repeat the series across the UK in 2020.

    He has given acclaimed solo recitals at The Wigmore Hall, Carnegie Hall and has performed for the British Royal Family on numerous occasions. One of the busiest concert pianists of his generation, he will give over 100 solo performances in 2020.

    His career has taken him all over the world, with solo performances in Australia, Europe and most recently solo tours in China and the USA. He is a popular soloist on the London concert scene and performs regularly in music societies, festivals, schools and concert halls throughout the UK and abroad and as guest artist on several of the world’s most famous cruise liners. He has 30 piano concertos in his repertoire, having made his concerto debut with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

    Warren’s growing discography has made an impact on critics, broadcasters and the public alike. His recordings have been featured by Classic FM as CD of the Week and his recordings are featured regularly on Classic FM and the BBC. He is currently recording the complete works of Chopin over a 3-year period for a 14-disc set for Sleeveless Records. “Stunning” Classic FM.

    He is Artistic Director of The Piccadilly Sinfonia and also of The Piccadilly Chamber Music Series. Warren has a law degree from the University of Warwick and studied piano with some of the world’s leading pedagogues, including Peter Feuchtwanger, Ronald Smith and John Barstow at The Royal College Of Music. He is now in demand himself as teacher in both masterclasses and private lessons. He teaches at Royal College of Music Junior Department and tutors on a number of residential piano courses, including Pro Corda, Piano Week, Pianissimi and Finchcocks, in addition to giving masterclasses and adjudications throughout the UK and further afield.

    “Tall and talented, Warren Mailley-Smith is the embodiment of a modern romantic concert pianist…” – Musical Opinion

    Nocturne No 1 in B flat minor from 3 Nocturnes
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Sonata for Piano No 2 in B flat minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Étude No 1 in F minor from Trois nouvelles études
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Mazurka No 21 in C sharp minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Nocturne No 18 in E
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Scherzo No 2 in B Flat minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
  • 1 February 2020 - 7:30pm
    Isata Kanneh-Mason plays Beethoven with English Symphony Orchestra
    English Symphony Orchestra, Isata Kanneh-Mason, Kenneth Woods
    Shirehall Hereford HR1 2HY
    United Kingdom

    Isata Kanneh-Mason has raced to the forefront of her generation as one of the UK’s most charismatic, popular and admired young pianists. She makes her English Symphony Orchestra debut as part of the orchestra’s celebration of Beethoven’s 250th anniversary with a performance of his stormy Piano Concerto in C minor. The concert opens with Mendelssohn’s tone poem Die Schöne Melusine is a richly-coloured musical setting of the mermaid myth. The concert ends with more Beethoven for his 250th birthday, his witty and life-affirming Eighth Symphony.

    Overture from Die schöne Melusine (The Fair Melusine)
    Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)
    Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No 3 in C minor
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
    Symphony No 8 in F
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • 1 February 2020 - 7:30pm
    Chopin and Champagne by candlelight: Sonata No 2
    Warren Mailley-Smith
    St Mary's Episcopal Cathedral Edinburgh EH12 5AW
    United Kingdom

    Concert pianist, Warren Mailley-Smith recently became the first British pianist to perform the complete works of Chopin in one series of concerts, from memory. Following the hugely successful Chopin and Champagne series in 2018/19, he brings another series of programmes of Chopin's greatest masterpieces to the UK in 2020.

    Warren Mailley-Smith recently became the first British pianist to perform Chopin’s complete works for solo piano from memory in a series of 11 recitals at St John’s Smith Square. Hailed by the critics as an “epic achievement”, Mailley-Smith will repeat the series across the UK in 2020.

    He has given acclaimed solo recitals at The Wigmore Hall, Carnegie Hall and has performed for the British Royal Family on numerous occasions. One of the busiest concert pianists of his generation, he will give over 100 solo performances in 2020.

    His career has taken him all over the world, with solo performances in Australia, Europe and most recently solo tours in China and the USA. He is a popular soloist on the London concert scene and performs regularly in music societies, festivals, schools and concert halls throughout the UK and abroad and as guest artist on several of the world’s most famous cruise liners.

    He has 30 piano concertos in his repertoire, having made his concerto debut with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

    Warren’s growing discography has made an impact on critics, broadcasters and the public alike. His recordings have been featured by Classic FM as CD of the Week and his recordings are featured regularly on Classic FM and the BBC. He is currently recording the complete works of Chopin over a 3-year period for a 14-disc set for Sleeveless Records.

    He is Artistic Director of The Piccadilly Sinfonia and also of The Piccadilly Chamber Music Series

    Warren studied with some of the world’s leading pedagogues, including Peter Feuchtwanger, Ronald Smith and John Barstow at The Royal College Of Music. He is now in demand himself as teacher in both masterclasses and private lessons. He teaches at Royal College of Music Junior Department and tutors on a number of residential piano courses, including Pro Corda, Piano Week, Pianissimi and Finchcocks, in addition to giving masterclasses and adjudications throughout the UK and further afield.

    “Tall and talented, Warren Mailley-Smith is the embodiment of a modern romantic concert pianist…” – Musical Opinion

    Nocturne No 1 in B flat minor from 3 Nocturnes
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Sonata for Piano No 2 in B flat minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Trois nouvelles études
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Mazurka No 21 in C sharp minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Nocturne No 18 in E
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Scherzo No 1 in B minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
  • 31 January 2020 - 7:30pm
    Isata Kanneh-Mason plays Beethoven with English Symphony Orchestra
    English Symphony Orchestra, Isata Kanneh-Mason, Kenneth Woods
    Routh Hall, Bromsgrove School Bromsgrove B61 7DU
    United Kingdom

    Isata Kanneh-Mason has raced to the forefront of her generation as one of the UK’s most charismatic, popular and admired young pianists. She makes her English Symphony Orchestra debut as part of the orchestra’s celebration of Beethoven’s 250th anniversary with a performance of his stormy Piano Concerto in C minor. Ruth Gipps was a musical genius ahead of her time, whose works abound in melodic inspiration. Her Cringlemire Garden is a touching and evocative portrait of the natural world. The concert ends with Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony, one of the most thrilling works in the repertoire.

    Cringlemire Garden - Impression for string orchestra
    Ruth Gipps (1921-1999)
    Symphony No 7 in A
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
    Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No 3 in C minor
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • 1 February 2020 - 7:30pm
    Marlow Community Choir present....... Messe solenelle de St Cécile
    Angela Good, Gillian Dibden, Guest Orchestra, Mark Griffiths, Marlow Community Choir at Borlase, Richard Quine
    St Lukes Church Maidenhead SL6 7AX
    United Kingdom
    Messe solennelle de Sainte Cécile (St Cecilia Mass)
    Charles Gounod (1818-1893)
    Ode at a Solemn Music, 'Blest pair of Sirens'
    Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry (1848-1918)
    O clap your hands
    Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)
    Ave verum corpus
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
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