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Format: 2020-02-24
Format: 2020-02-24
  • 2 March 2020 - 6:30pm
    Beethoven in the City of London | The Hanover Band
    Benjamin Bayl, The Hanover Band
    Stationers' Hall London EC4M 7DD
    United Kingdom

    This is the first in a series of monthly concerts by The Hanover Band to celebrate Beethoven's 250th anniversary in 2020. A different symphony will be performed each month in one of the Livery Companies in the City of London culminating in the 9th on Beethoven's actual birthday the 16th December 2020. For further information about all of the venues being used and the dates and times of each concert please visit the band's website

    Symphony No 4 in B flat
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • 26 February 2020 - 7:30pm
    Endellion String Quartet
    Andrew Watkinson, David Waterman, Endellion String Quartet, Garfield Jackson, Ralph de Souza
    West Road Concert Hall Cambridge CB3 9DP
    United Kingdom

    ‘To experience all of Beethoven’s sixteen quartets — collectively, surely, one of the peaks of human endeavour — is to take a wonderful opportunity both to enter into each of these extraordinarily individual universes, and also to hear them in the context of one another. This enables us to appreciate the family resemblances between them, which make them all unmistakably ‘Beethoven’ — reflecting his profound humanity, integrity, moral seriousness, humour, light-heartedness, love, forcefulness, energy and self-belief. It also highlights the myriad differences of character, mood, style and sound-world which make one marvel at the sheer range, fertility and freshness of Beethoven’s imagination.

    In arranging the programmes, the Quartet’s aim is to give each concert as much variety and balance as possible by choosing pieces of contrasting character, and from different periods.

    The six Op 18 quartets are extraordinary masterpieces and not just preludes to what was to follow. Writing them between the ages of 28 and 30, Beethoven had studied and absorbed the language and style of the great quartets of Haydn and Mozart, but the Op.18s are saturated with Beethoven’s own personality. At this time he was working and performing with colossal energy, was constantly in and out of love, and already sure of his own powers and their true value.

    The ‘Razumovsky’ quartets and Opp 74 and 95, written between the ages of 35 and 40 broke boundaries in scale and profundity, and in their demands on players and listeners alike. Opp 74 and 95 grope towards yet further innovations. In this period, Beethoven was struggling to come to terms with his growing deafness and the social isolation it was imposing on this wonderfully warm and gregarious man. His cry of pain in the ‘Heiligenstadt’ testament is heart-rending; yet no note of self-pity enters his music.

    Beethoven confided his most intimate thoughts to his ‘late’ quartets, written between the ages of 52 and 57 (the age at which he died). His imaginative powers — free of all conventions, practical restraints and compromises — seemed to deepen as his circumstances deteriorated. Ill health, loneliness, financial worries, the increasing rarity of performances of his works especially in a Vienna besotted with Rossini, the attempted suicide of his beloved nephew and ward, Karl — all these were the background to these late works of genius which so baffled Beethoven’s contemporaries, and about which he calmly explained they ‘were written for a later age.’

    ‘There’s always a feeling when listening to the Endellion Quartet that you’re listening to the Urtext method of quartet playing. Maybe 35 years of playing together has brought a uniformity of thought and instinct to them as a group that allows them to play as a single entity’ — Gramophone Magazine

    ‘The Endellion is a quartet of the first rank: precision, clarity of articulation, and beauty of sound characterize both the individual playing and the stimulating interplay of the four team-mates.’ — La Presse, Montreal

    ‘ … The Endellion’s warm sound and impeccable style … they function as an indivisible expressive unit, playing with that innate understanding of each other that only comes from a long experience of making music together … superb … real eloquence and passion … outstandingly done’ — Guardian

    'The Endellion is arguably the finest quartet in Britain, playing with poise, true intonation, excellent balance and a beautiful tone’ — New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians

    String Quartet No 11 in F minor, 'Serioso'
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
    String Quartet No 4 in C minor
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
    String Quartet No 7 in F, 'Rasumovsky'
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • 3 March 2020 - 7:30pm
    Schola Cantorum 40th anniversary concert with Roderick Williams
    Cardinal Vaughan Schola Cantorum, Roderick Williams, The Belgravia Chamber Orchestra
    Cadogan Hall London SW1X 9DQ
    United Kingdom

    A concert celebrating the 40th birthday of one of London’s leading boys choirs, the Schola Cantorum of The Cardinal Vaughan Memorial School. The programme is a wide-ranging one, with music from JS Bach to Danny Elfman, reflecting the varied work of the Schola, which is heard in cathedrals and churches all over the world, in London’s opera houses and on numerous film tracks.

    The Schola is joined by a very special guest, the renowned baritone Roderick Williams OBE, who is also to compose a new work to mark the occasion.

    5 Mystical Songs
    Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)
    Great is the Lord
    Sir Edward Elgar (1857-1934)
    Coronation Anthem No 1: Zadok the Priest
    George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)
    Messe à deux choeurs et deux orgues
    Charles-Marie Widor (1844-1937)
  • 24 February 2020 - 7:30pm
    Chopin and Champagne by candlelight | February | Sonata No 3 and Berceuse
    Warren Mailley-Smith
    St Luke's Church Brighton BN2 0GG
    United Kingdom

    Warren Mailley-Smith recently became the first British pianist to perform Chopin’s complete works for solo piano from memory in a series of 11 recitals at St John’s Smith Square. Hailed by the critics as an “epic achievement”, Mailley-Smith will repeat the series across the UK in 2020.

    He has given acclaimed solo recitals at The Wigmore Hall, Carnegie Hall and has performed for the British Royal Family on numerous occasions. One of the busiest concert pianists of his generation, he will give over 100 solo performances in 2020.

    His career has taken him all over the world, with solo performances in Australia, Europe and most recently solo tours in China and the USA. He is a popular soloist on the London concert scene and performs regularly in music societies, festivals, schools and concert halls throughout the UK and abroad and as guest artist on several of the world’s most famous cruise liners.

    He has 30 piano concertos in his repertoire, having made his concerto debut with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

    Warren’s growing discography has made an impact on critics, broadcasters and the public alike. His recordings have been featured by Classic FM as CD of the Week and his recordings are featured regularly on Classic FM and the BBC. He is currently recording the complete works of Chopin over a 3-year period for a 14-disc set for Sleeveless Records.

    He is Artistic Director of The Piccadilly Sinfonia and also of The Piccadilly Chamber Music Series.

    Warren studied with some of the world’s leading pedagogues, including Peter Feuchtwanger, Ronald Smith and John Barstow at The Royal College Of Music. He is now in demand himself as teacher in both masterclasses and private lessons. He teaches at Royal College of Music Junior Department and tutors on a number of residential piano courses, including Pro Corda, Piano Week, Pianissimi and Finchcocks, in addition to giving masterclasses and adjudications throughout the UK and further afield.

    “Tall and talented, Warren Mailley-Smith is the embodiment of a modern romantic concert pianist…” – Musical Opinion

    3 Ecossaises
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Fantaisie-Impromptu in C sharp minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Waltz No 14 in E minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Variations brillantes on 'Je vends des scapulaires'
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Berceuse in D flat
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Nocturne No 19 in E minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Mazurka No 41 in C sharp minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Sonata for Piano No 3 in B minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
  • 29 February 2020 - 10:30am
    Platinum Choral Workshop: Dodecahedral Polyphony II
    Platinum Consort, Scott Inglis-Kidger
    St Mary's Church, Battersea London SW11 3NA
    United Kingdom

    Owing to the success of last year’s Dodecahedral workshop, we continue to explore glorious music in twelve parts, set in various tri-choir combinations. We start with a composer who is a master of the polychoral technique — Hieronymus Praetorius. Published in Hamburg in the Cantiones Variae of 1613, his setting of the text Tota pulchra es contains a perfect fusion of homophony and polyphony, along with an edgy, rhythmic drive. Slightly earlier than Praetorius, fellow German Hans Leo Hassler’s setting of the Duo seraphim was published in the Cantiones Sacrae de Festis Praecipibus Totius Anni in 1591. Hassler engages no less than four treble parts in this motet and, in a similar vein to the Guerrero setting we studied last year, does not miss an opportunity to depict the two angels who sing as a duet for the first ten bars. Serving as a contrast, the final 12-part motet is by Franco Flemish composer Orlande de Lassus, and was published in his Magnum Opus Musicum in 1604. This setting of Psalm 3 displays Lassus’s wondrous ability to create tone colour and drama through various combinations of high and low voices, subverting the expectations of an antiphonal tri-choir texture.

    Tota pulchra es, amica mea
    Hieronymous Praetorius (1560-1629)
    Duo seraphim a 12
    Hans Leo Hassler (1564-1612)
    Domine quid multiplicati sunt a12
    Orlande de Lassus (1532-1594)
  • 29 February 2020 - 7:30pm
    Revolution | The Handful (chamber choir)
    The Handful, Tomos Watkins
    St Mary's Church Bathwick, Bath BA2 4EB
    United Kingdom

    Advance, Democracy! is a hot-blooded exhortation to advance political change from an idealistic young composer, and a piece of unabashed political propaganda. In it, Britten paints a dark picture of the threat of dictatorship if democracy doesn’t ‘rise up and cry that what our fathers fought for we’ll not allow to die’.

    Ten Poems on texts by Revolutionary Poets by Shostakovich shows a different side to the apparently sardonic composer of the 5th Symphony, or the glitter of his Jazz Suites. These settings of socialist poems are dark, dramatic and at times operatic. Mauersberger’s Wie liegt die Stadt is a heart-breaking response to the bombing of Dresden by the conductor of the famous Dresdner Kreuzchor – ‘how desolate lies the city that was once so full of people!

    Tackling a revolution of a different kind, Dove’s The Passing of the Year meditates on the way in which the year shapes humanity, and more broadly – shapes our relationship with nature. At this moment of climate emergency, it’s more relevant than ever. A selection of gorgeous, thought-provoking and reflective pieces by Cecilia McDowall, Vaughan Williams, Pearsall and Holst complete this fascinating programme.

    The Handful has enjoyed an enviable reputation as one of the most exciting, vibrant and adventurous chamber choirs in and around Bath. Founded in 2002 as ‘A Handful of Singers’, the choir started out as a small group of experienced singers. Since then the choir has grown both in size (to 24 singers) and in stature. Now with Tomos Watkins at the helm, The Handful has entered a new phase as a forward-looking choir, always enthralling audiences with its fine sound and imaginative programming, and always seeking to leave them captivated.

    ‘I found myself transfixed by the sheer beauty of their singing and the depth of their understanding’ Bath Chronicle, Feb 2019

    Advance Democracy
    Benjamin Britten (1913-1976)
    Excerpts from 10 Poems on texts by Revolutionary Poets
    Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975)
    Nunc dimittis
    Gustav Holst (1874-1934)
    The Passing of the Year
    Jonathan Dove (1959-)
    A Fancy of Folksongs
    Cecilia McDowall (1951-)
    The lover's ghost from 5 English Folksongs
    Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)
    Wie liegt die Stadt so wüst
    Rudolf Mauersberger (1889-1971)
    Lay a garland on her hearse
    Robert Lucas Pearsall (1795-1856)
  • 27 February 2020 - 7:30pm
    Chopin and Champagne by candlelight | February | Sonata No 3 and Berceuse
    Warren Mailley-Smith
    St Ann's Church Manchester M2 7LF
    United Kingdom

    Warren Mailley-Smith recently became the first British pianist to perform Chopin’s complete works for solo piano from memory in a series of 11 recitals at St John’s Smith Square. Hailed by the critics as an “epic achievement”, Mailley-Smith will repeat the series across the UK in 2020.

    He has given acclaimed solo recitals at The Wigmore Hall, Carnegie Hall and has performed for the British Royal Family on numerous occasions. One of the busiest concert pianists of his generation, he will give over 100 solo performances in 2020.

    His career has taken him all over the world, with solo performances in Australia, Europe and most recently solo tours in China and the USA. He is a popular soloist on the London concert scene and performs regularly in music societies, festivals, schools and concert halls throughout the UK and abroad and as guest artist on several of the world’s most famous cruise liners.

    He has 30 piano concertos in his repertoire, having made his concerto debut with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

    Warren’s growing discography has made an impact on critics, broadcasters and the public alike. His recordings have been featured by Classic FM as CD of the Week and his recordings are featured regularly on Classic FM and the BBC. He is currently recording the complete works of Chopin over a 3-year period for a 14-disc set for Sleeveless Records.

    He is Artistic Director of The Piccadilly Sinfonia and also of The Piccadilly Chamber Music Series.

    Warren studied with some of the world’s leading pedagogues, including Peter Feuchtwanger, Ronald Smith and John Barstow at The Royal College Of Music. He is now in demand himself as teacher in both masterclasses and private lessons. He teaches at Royal College of Music Junior Department and tutors on a number of residential piano courses, including Pro Corda, Piano Week, Pianissimi and Finchcocks, in addition to giving masterclasses and adjudications throughout the UK and further afield.

    “Tall and talented, Warren Mailley-Smith is the embodiment of a modern romantic concert pianist…” – Musical Opinion

    3 Ecossaises
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Fantaisie-Impromptu in C sharp minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Waltz No 14 in E minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Variations brillantes on 'Je vends des scapulaires'
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Berceuse in D flat
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Nocturne No 19 in E minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Mazurka No 41 in C sharp minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Sonata for Piano No 3 in B minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
  • 1 March 2020 - 11:00am
    Classical Coffee Mornings - Brompton Quartet
    Brompton Quartet, Emily Turkanik, Hannah Gardiner, Maja Horvat, Wallis Power
    Elgar Room, Royal Albert Hall London SW7 2AP
    United Kingdom

    Watch inspirational performances by outstanding young performers from the Royal College of Music whilst enjoying a hot drink and a pastry in the Hall’s Elgar Room.

    Performing at this Classical Coffee Morning are The Brompton Quartet, comprised of musicians from the UK, Austria and Slovenia, studying at the Royal College and Royal Academy of Music in London.

    They were winners at the 2019 St Martin in the Fields Chamber Music Competition, and since forming in September 2018 have worked with artists including Daniel Rowland (Brodsky Quartet), Mats Zitterqvist (Chamber Orchestra of Europe) and Heinz Holliger.

    String Quartet in B flat, 'Sunrise'
    (Franz) Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)
    3 Pieces for String Quartet
    Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971)
    String Quartet No 11 in F minor, 'Serioso'
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • 29 February 2020 - 7:30pm
    Chopin and Champagne by candlelight | February | Sonata No 3 and Berceuse
    Warren Mailley-Smith
    St Mary's Episcopal Cathedral Edinburgh EH12 5AW
    United Kingdom

    Warren Mailley-Smith recently became the first British pianist to perform Chopin’s complete works for solo piano from memory in a series of 11 recitals at St John’s Smith Square. Hailed by the critics as an “epic achievement”, Mailley-Smith will repeat the series across the UK in 2020.

    He has given acclaimed solo recitals at The Wigmore Hall, Carnegie Hall and has performed for the British Royal Family on numerous occasions. One of the busiest concert pianists of his generation, he will give over 100 solo performances in 2020.

    His career has taken him all over the world, with solo performances in Australia, Europe and most recently solo tours in China and the USA. He is a popular soloist on the London concert scene and performs regularly in music societies, festivals, schools and concert halls throughout the UK and abroad and as guest artist on several of the world’s most famous cruise liners.

    He has 30 piano concertos in his repertoire, having made his concerto debut with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

    Warren’s growing discography has made an impact on critics, broadcasters and the public alike. His recordings have been featured by Classic FM as CD of the Week and his recordings are featured regularly on Classic FM and the BBC. He is currently recording the complete works of Chopin over a 3-year period for a 14-disc set for Sleeveless Records.

    He is Artistic Director of The Piccadilly Sinfonia and also of The Piccadilly Chamber Music Series.

    Warren studied with some of the world’s leading pedagogues, including Peter Feuchtwanger, Ronald Smith and John Barstow at The Royal College Of Music. He is now in demand himself as teacher in both masterclasses and private lessons. He teaches at Royal College of Music Junior Department and tutors on a number of residential piano courses, including Pro Corda, Piano Week, Pianissimi and Finchcocks, in addition to giving masterclasses and adjudications throughout the UK and further afield.

    “Tall and talented, Warren Mailley-Smith is the embodiment of a modern romantic concert pianist…” – Musical Opinion

    3 Ecossaises
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Fantaisie-Impromptu in C sharp minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Waltz No 14 in E minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Variations brillantes on 'Je vends des scapulaires'
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Berceuse in D flat
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Nocturne No 19 in E minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Mazurka No 41 in C sharp minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Sonata for Piano No 3 in B minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
  • 29 February 2020 - 7:30pm
    Vivaldi's Four Seasons by candlelight | Piccadilly Sinfonietta
    Marije Johnston, Piccadilly Sinfonietta
    St James's Church, Piccadilly London W1J 9LL
    United Kingdom

    On Saturday 29th February 2020, in the heart of London just steps away from Piccadilly Circus, the walls of St James’s Church, Piccadilly will resound with the music of Vivaldi, Bach, Handel, and Mozart, played by Marije Johnston, and the Piccadilly Sinfonietta.

    Experience a romantic, candlelit evening with selections of the world’s greatest classical music in the gorgeous St James’s Church, Piccadilly. The concert features timeless works by the monumental composers, Mozart, Handel, Bach, and Vivaldi. If you’re in need of a relaxing experience, want to learn more about classical music, or just want to hear virtuosic performances by some of the best, young performers in the UK, this concert is just for you.

    The Piccadilly Sinfonietta is one of the UK’s most exciting young ensembles. Founded in 2018, the ensemble has performed in halls throughout the UK including London, Liverpool, Edinburgh, Manchester and further afield. The Piccadilly Sinfonia exists to perform the world’s greatest classical music in the UK’s most historic venues.

    The concert features breath-taking feats of virtuosity from violinist sensation, Marije Johnston, in Vivaldi’s Four Seasons and Bach’s Violin Concerto in E Major.

    Dutch violinist Marije Johnston has won numerous prizes, including all the RNCM’s chamber music prizes as a member of the Navarra Quartet. As a soloist Marije performed Shostakovich’s violin concerto No. 1 with the Royal Northern College of Music’s Symphony Orchestra after winning the prestigious concerto auditions held at the Royal Northern College of Music and performed concertos by Tippett, Schnittke and the Brahms ‘Double’ Concerto with the same orchestra. Awarded the Royal Northern College of Music’s highest accolade, the Gold Medal, Marije is much in demand as a chamber musician and often plays with ensembles such as the Fibonacci Sequence, Schubert Ensemble and Aronowitz Ensemble.

    So why not treat yourself to a spectacular evening and join us for a concert to remember of uplifting music.

    Arrival of the Queen of Sheba from Solomon
    George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)
    Concerto for violin and strings in E major
    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
    Divertimento No 11 in D
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    Le quattro stagioni, 'The Four Seasons'
    Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741)
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