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Format: 2020-02-19
Format: 2020-02-19
  • 22 February 2020 - 8:00pm
    Oxshott and Cobham Music Society - Wihan Quartet
    Wihan Quartet
    Holy Trinity Church Claygate KT10 0JP
    United Kingdom

    The Wihan Quartet has been described by International Record Review as: ‘one of the best quartets in the world today.’ In 2015 the Quartet celebrated 30 years since its formation, and over the years it has developed an outstanding reputation for the interpretation of its native Czech heritage, and of the many classical, romantic and modern masterpieces of the string quartet repertoire.

    The Quartet’s recording of Dvorák's Op 34/Op 105 was chosen as a ‘Recording of the Year’ by MusicWeb International and BBC Music Magazine said of their Dvorák Op 61 recording: ‘This is the finest recorded performance I have encountered to date’ The Wihan’s release of Schubert G Major received an ‘Outstanding’ from International Record Review and The Sunday Times said of the recording: ‘This is playing of the highest quality…..Their tempo allows you to savor to the full the harmonic richness of this extraordinary music.’

    During the 2012/13 season the Quartet was Czech Chamber Music Society Resident Ensemble at the Rudolfinum Dvorák Hall, Prague. In 2008 the Quartet completed the first ever cycle of Beethoven Quartets in Prague and also repeated this cycle at Blackheath Halls, London. This landmark series of Beethoven concerts in Prague was recorded for release on CD and DVD for Nimbus Alliance and received many accolades.

    The Wihan Quartet has won many International Competitions including The Prague Spring Festival and the Osaka ‘Chamber Festa’. In 1991, they won both the First Prize and the Audience Prize in the London International String Quartet Competition. The Quartet are the ‘Richard Carne Quartet in Residence’ at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, London. They are also great supporters of the work of the Cavatina Chamber Music Trust, which gives inspirational concerts and master classes to young people in many parts of the UK.

    Jirí Zigmund, retired from the Wihan Quartet in 2014. The Quartet was very fortunate to find an excellent viola player in Jakub Cepický, son of Leoš, and his first recording with the Quartet of Suk, Dvorak and Janacek was released on Nimbus Alliance in 2016: 'the Wihan Quartet give a very special performance of Dvorák's last and greatest quartet.....one of the most experienced and admired of chamber ensemble, The Wihan Quartet gives a deeply considered ensemble performance. The sweetness of tone achieved in the Adagio is remarkable and the first movement has irresistible impetus.....this CD shows the Wihan to be in fine form.....' BBC Music Magazine, May 2016.

    In 2017, after 32 years as a member of the Wihan Quartet, cellist Ales Kasprik retired from the Quartet. The Quartet have been very fortunate to find a wonderful cellist to perform with them: the excellent Michal Kanka, cellist with one of the best Czech string quartets, the Prazak Quartet.

    String Quartet No 2 in D minor
    Bedrich Smetana (1824-1884)
    String Quartet No 2 in D
    Alexander Borodin (1833-1887)
    String Quartet No 9 in D minor
    Antonín Dvorák (1841-1904)
  • 20 February 2020 - 7:30pm
    Wye Valley Chamber Music Festival
    Alice Neary, Claire Sterling, David Adams, Emily Nebel, Harry Atkinson, Joel Siepmann, Malin William-Olsson, Salomé Quartet
    The Bridges Centre, Drybridge House Monmouth NP25 5AS
    United Kingdom

    Wye Valley Chamber Music Festival is back! Join us for some world-class music-making from an array of internationally-renowned musicians! Over the Festival week (15-23 Feb 2020) we will be bringing you concert programmes that include Brahms, Elgar, Mendelssohn and Bridge amongst others. There will also be plenty of Beethoven to commemorate his 250th birthday, plus music from Beethoven's lesser known contemporaries: Hummel, Onslow and Ries. There will also be a celebration of British music and the World Premiere of a special commission by composer Philip Cashian to celebrate the Festival's 20th birthday.

    String Quintet No 28 in G minor
    George Onslow (1784-1853)
    String Quartet No 1 in C
    Johann Nepomuk Hummel (1778-1837)
    String Quartet No 9 in C, 'Rasumovsky'
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • 22 February 2020 - 11:30am
    Wye Valley Chamber Music Festival - Discovery Day: Beethoven in context
    Alice Neary, Christoph Richter, Claire Sterling, Daniel Tong, David Adams, Florence Cooke, Florence Plane, Harry Atkinson, Kate Gould, Kay Stephen, Malin Broman, Malin William-Olsson, Robert Plane, Robin Green, Salomé Quartet, Simon Crawford-Phillips, Tom Hankey
    Treowen Manor Dingestow NP25 2DL
    United Kingdom

    Wye Valley Chamber Music Festival is back! Join us for some world-class music-making from an array of internationally-renowned musicians! Over the Festival week (15-23 Feb 2020) we will be bringing you concert programmes that include Brahms, Elgar, Mendelssohn and Bridge amongst others. There will also be plenty of Beethoven to commemorate his 250th birthday, plus music from Beethoven's lesser known contemporaries: Hummel, Onslow and Ries. There will also be a celebration of British music and the World Premiere of a special commission by composer Philip Cashian to celebrate the Festival's 20th birthday.

    Piano Trio in E flat
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
    Septet
    Ignaz Moscheles (1794-1870)
    String Quintet No 2 in D minor
    Ferdinand Ries (1784-1838)
    Septet in E flat
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
    Adagio and Rondo concertante in F, for piano quartet
    Franz Schubert (1797-1828)
    Piano Trio in D, 'Ghost'
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • 23 February 2020 - 4:00pm
    Wye Valley Chamber Music Festival
    Alice Neary, Daniel Tong, David Adams, Emily Nebel, Florence Cooke, Joel Siepmann, Kate Gould, Kay Stephen, Malin Broman, Robert Plane, Robin Green, Tom Hankey
    The Bridges Centre, Drybridge House Monmouth NP25 5AS
    United Kingdom

    Wye Valley Chamber Music Festival is back! Join us for some world-class music-making from an array of internationally-renowned musicians! Over the Festival week (15-23 Feb 2020) we will be bringing you concert programmes that include Brahms, Elgar, Mendelssohn and Bridge amongst others. There will also be plenty of Beethoven to commemorate his 250th birthday, plus music from Beethoven's lesser known contemporaries: Hummel, Onslow and Ries. There will also be a celebration of British music and the World Premiere of a special commission by composer Philip Cashian to celebrate the Festival's 20th birthday.

    Quartet for piano and strings in D minor
    Sir William Walton (1902-1983)
    Piano Quartet
    Philip Cashian (1963-)
    Rhapsodic Quintet, for clarinet and strings
    Herbert Howells (1892-1983)
    Quintet for piano and strings in D minor
    Frank Bridge (1879-1941)
  • 19 February 2020 - 7:00pm
    Romantic Souvenirs | Mami Shikimori (piano)
    Mami Shikimori
    1901 Arts Club London SE1 8UE
    United Kingdom

    Pianist Mami Shikimori plays some rarely heard Tchaikovsky repertoire from her latest Naxos CD, as well as Chopin’s masterworks.

    Join us in our initmate, salon-style venue, just round the corner from Waterloo Station.

    Doors open at 6.30pm giving you time to relax in our stunning bar and lounge before the concert.

    Ruines d’un château from Souvenir de Hapsal, for piano
    Pyotr Tchaikovsky (1840-1893)
    Nocturne No 1 in B flat minor from 3 Nocturnes
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Nocturne No 5 in F sharp major
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Ballade No 1 in G minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Ballade No 4 in F minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Valse-caprice in D, for piano
    Pyotr Tchaikovsky (1840-1893)
    Embraceable you from 7 Études on Gershwin songs
    George Gershwin (1898-1937)
  • 26 February 2020 - 7:30pm
    Endellion String Quartet
    Andrew Watkinson, David Waterman, Endellion String Quartet, Garfield Jackson, Ralph de Souza
    West Road Concert Hall Cambridge CB3 9DP
    United Kingdom

    ‘To experience all of Beethoven’s sixteen quartets — collectively, surely, one of the peaks of human endeavour — is to take a wonderful opportunity both to enter into each of these extraordinarily individual universes, and also to hear them in the context of one another. This enables us to appreciate the family resemblances between them, which make them all unmistakably ‘Beethoven’ — reflecting his profound humanity, integrity, moral seriousness, humour, light-heartedness, love, forcefulness, energy and self-belief. It also highlights the myriad differences of character, mood, style and sound-world which make one marvel at the sheer range, fertility and freshness of Beethoven’s imagination.

    In arranging the programmes, the Quartet’s aim is to give each concert as much variety and balance as possible by choosing pieces of contrasting character, and from different periods.

    The six Op 18 quartets are extraordinary masterpieces and not just preludes to what was to follow. Writing them between the ages of 28 and 30, Beethoven had studied and absorbed the language and style of the great quartets of Haydn and Mozart, but the Op.18s are saturated with Beethoven’s own personality. At this time he was working and performing with colossal energy, was constantly in and out of love, and already sure of his own powers and their true value.

    The ‘Razumovsky’ quartets and Opp 74 and 95, written between the ages of 35 and 40 broke boundaries in scale and profundity, and in their demands on players and listeners alike. Opp 74 and 95 grope towards yet further innovations. In this period, Beethoven was struggling to come to terms with his growing deafness and the social isolation it was imposing on this wonderfully warm and gregarious man. His cry of pain in the ‘Heiligenstadt’ testament is heart-rending; yet no note of self-pity enters his music.

    Beethoven confided his most intimate thoughts to his ‘late’ quartets, written between the ages of 52 and 57 (the age at which he died). His imaginative powers — free of all conventions, practical restraints and compromises — seemed to deepen as his circumstances deteriorated. Ill health, loneliness, financial worries, the increasing rarity of performances of his works especially in a Vienna besotted with Rossini, the attempted suicide of his beloved nephew and ward, Karl — all these were the background to these late works of genius which so baffled Beethoven’s contemporaries, and about which he calmly explained they ‘were written for a later age.’

    ‘There’s always a feeling when listening to the Endellion Quartet that you’re listening to the Urtext method of quartet playing. Maybe 35 years of playing together has brought a uniformity of thought and instinct to them as a group that allows them to play as a single entity’ — Gramophone Magazine

    ‘The Endellion is a quartet of the first rank: precision, clarity of articulation, and beauty of sound characterize both the individual playing and the stimulating interplay of the four team-mates.’ — La Presse, Montreal

    ‘ … The Endellion’s warm sound and impeccable style … they function as an indivisible expressive unit, playing with that innate understanding of each other that only comes from a long experience of making music together … superb … real eloquence and passion … outstandingly done’ — Guardian

    'The Endellion is arguably the finest quartet in Britain, playing with poise, true intonation, excellent balance and a beautiful tone’ — New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians

    String Quartet No 11 in F minor, 'Serioso'
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
    String Quartet No 4 in C minor
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
    String Quartet No 7 in F, 'Rasumovsky'
    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • 24 February 2020 - 7:30pm
    Chopin and Champagne by candlelight | February | Sonata No 3 and Berceuse
    Warren Mailley-Smith
    St Luke's Church Brighton BN2 0GG
    United Kingdom

    Warren Mailley-Smith recently became the first British pianist to perform Chopin’s complete works for solo piano from memory in a series of 11 recitals at St John’s Smith Square. Hailed by the critics as an “epic achievement”, Mailley-Smith will repeat the series across the UK in 2020.

    He has given acclaimed solo recitals at The Wigmore Hall, Carnegie Hall and has performed for the British Royal Family on numerous occasions. One of the busiest concert pianists of his generation, he will give over 100 solo performances in 2020.

    His career has taken him all over the world, with solo performances in Australia, Europe and most recently solo tours in China and the USA. He is a popular soloist on the London concert scene and performs regularly in music societies, festivals, schools and concert halls throughout the UK and abroad and as guest artist on several of the world’s most famous cruise liners.

    He has 30 piano concertos in his repertoire, having made his concerto debut with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

    Warren’s growing discography has made an impact on critics, broadcasters and the public alike. His recordings have been featured by Classic FM as CD of the Week and his recordings are featured regularly on Classic FM and the BBC. He is currently recording the complete works of Chopin over a 3-year period for a 14-disc set for Sleeveless Records.

    He is Artistic Director of The Piccadilly Sinfonia and also of The Piccadilly Chamber Music Series.

    Warren studied with some of the world’s leading pedagogues, including Peter Feuchtwanger, Ronald Smith and John Barstow at The Royal College Of Music. He is now in demand himself as teacher in both masterclasses and private lessons. He teaches at Royal College of Music Junior Department and tutors on a number of residential piano courses, including Pro Corda, Piano Week, Pianissimi and Finchcocks, in addition to giving masterclasses and adjudications throughout the UK and further afield.

    “Tall and talented, Warren Mailley-Smith is the embodiment of a modern romantic concert pianist…” – Musical Opinion

    3 Ecossaises
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Fantaisie-Impromptu in C sharp minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Waltz No 14 in E minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Variations brillantes on 'Je vends des scapulaires'
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Berceuse in D flat
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Nocturne No 19 in E minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Mazurka No 41 in C sharp minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Sonata for Piano No 3 in B minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
  • 29 February 2020 - 10:30am
    Platinum Choral Workshop: Dodecahedral Polyphony II
    Platinum Consort, Scott Inglis-Kidger
    St Mary's Church, Battersea London SW11 3NA
    United Kingdom

    Owing to the success of last year’s Dodecahedral workshop, we continue to explore glorious music in twelve parts, set in various tri-choir combinations. We start with a composer who is a master of the polychoral technique — Hieronymus Praetorius. Published in Hamburg in the Cantiones Variae of 1613, his setting of the text Tota pulchra es contains a perfect fusion of homophony and polyphony, along with an edgy, rhythmic drive. Slightly earlier than Praetorius, fellow German Hans Leo Hassler’s setting of the Duo seraphim was published in the Cantiones Sacrae de Festis Praecipibus Totius Anni in 1591. Hassler engages no less than four treble parts in this motet and, in a similar vein to the Guerrero setting we studied last year, does not miss an opportunity to depict the two angels who sing as a duet for the first ten bars. Serving as a contrast, the final 12-part motet is by Franco Flemish composer Orlande de Lassus, and was published in his Magnum Opus Musicum in 1604. This setting of Psalm 3 displays Lassus’s wondrous ability to create tone colour and drama through various combinations of high and low voices, subverting the expectations of an antiphonal tri-choir texture.

    Tota pulchra es, amica mea
    Hieronymous Praetorius (1560-1629)
    Duo seraphim a 12
    Hans Leo Hassler (1564-1612)
    Domine quid multiplicati sunt a12
    Orlande de Lassus (1532-1594)
  • 29 February 2020 - 7:30pm
    Revolution | The Handful (chamber choir)
    The Handful, Tomos Watkins
    St Mary's Church Bathwick, Bath BA2 4EB
    United Kingdom

    Advance, Democracy! is a hot-blooded exhortation to advance political change from an idealistic young composer, and a piece of unabashed political propaganda. In it, Britten paints a dark picture of the threat of dictatorship if democracy doesn’t ‘rise up and cry that what our fathers fought for we’ll not allow to die’.

    Ten Poems on texts by Revolutionary Poets by Shostakovich shows a different side to the apparently sardonic composer of the 5th Symphony, or the glitter of his Jazz Suites. These settings of socialist poems are dark, dramatic and at times operatic. Mauersberger’s Wie liegt die Stadt is a heart-breaking response to the bombing of Dresden by the conductor of the famous Dresdner Kreuzchor – ‘how desolate lies the city that was once so full of people!

    Tackling a revolution of a different kind, Dove’s The Passing of the Year meditates on the way in which the year shapes humanity, and more broadly – shapes our relationship with nature. At this moment of climate emergency, it’s more relevant than ever. A selection of gorgeous, thought-provoking and reflective pieces by Cecilia McDowall, Vaughan Williams, Pearsall and Holst complete this fascinating programme.

    The Handful has enjoyed an enviable reputation as one of the most exciting, vibrant and adventurous chamber choirs in and around Bath. Founded in 2002 as ‘A Handful of Singers’, the choir started out as a small group of experienced singers. Since then the choir has grown both in size (to 24 singers) and in stature. Now with Tomos Watkins at the helm, The Handful has entered a new phase as a forward-looking choir, always enthralling audiences with its fine sound and imaginative programming, and always seeking to leave them captivated.

    ‘I found myself transfixed by the sheer beauty of their singing and the depth of their understanding’ Bath Chronicle, Feb 2019

    Advance Democracy
    Benjamin Britten (1913-1976)
    Excerpts from 10 Poems on texts by Revolutionary Poets
    Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975)
    Nunc dimittis
    Gustav Holst (1874-1934)
    The Passing of the Year
    Jonathan Dove (1959-)
    A Fancy of Folksongs
    Cecilia McDowall (1951-)
    The lover's ghost from 5 English Folksongs
    Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)
    Wie liegt die Stadt so wüst
    Rudolf Mauersberger (1889-1971)
    Lay a garland on her hearse
    Robert Lucas Pearsall (1795-1856)
  • 27 February 2020 - 7:30pm
    Chopin and Champagne by candlelight | February | Sonata No 3 and Berceuse
    Warren Mailley-Smith
    St Ann's Church Manchester M2 7LF
    United Kingdom

    Warren Mailley-Smith recently became the first British pianist to perform Chopin’s complete works for solo piano from memory in a series of 11 recitals at St John’s Smith Square. Hailed by the critics as an “epic achievement”, Mailley-Smith will repeat the series across the UK in 2020.

    He has given acclaimed solo recitals at The Wigmore Hall, Carnegie Hall and has performed for the British Royal Family on numerous occasions. One of the busiest concert pianists of his generation, he will give over 100 solo performances in 2020.

    His career has taken him all over the world, with solo performances in Australia, Europe and most recently solo tours in China and the USA. He is a popular soloist on the London concert scene and performs regularly in music societies, festivals, schools and concert halls throughout the UK and abroad and as guest artist on several of the world’s most famous cruise liners.

    He has 30 piano concertos in his repertoire, having made his concerto debut with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

    Warren’s growing discography has made an impact on critics, broadcasters and the public alike. His recordings have been featured by Classic FM as CD of the Week and his recordings are featured regularly on Classic FM and the BBC. He is currently recording the complete works of Chopin over a 3-year period for a 14-disc set for Sleeveless Records.

    He is Artistic Director of The Piccadilly Sinfonia and also of The Piccadilly Chamber Music Series.

    Warren studied with some of the world’s leading pedagogues, including Peter Feuchtwanger, Ronald Smith and John Barstow at The Royal College Of Music. He is now in demand himself as teacher in both masterclasses and private lessons. He teaches at Royal College of Music Junior Department and tutors on a number of residential piano courses, including Pro Corda, Piano Week, Pianissimi and Finchcocks, in addition to giving masterclasses and adjudications throughout the UK and further afield.

    “Tall and talented, Warren Mailley-Smith is the embodiment of a modern romantic concert pianist…” – Musical Opinion

    3 Ecossaises
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Fantaisie-Impromptu in C sharp minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Waltz No 14 in E minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Variations brillantes on 'Je vends des scapulaires'
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Berceuse in D flat
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Nocturne No 19 in E minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Mazurka No 41 in C sharp minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
    Sonata for Piano No 3 in B minor
    Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)
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